Hi I am Michelle. Also known as Gwen or Loverly on Aywas.com. Account #426. Feel free to pester me if you want.

Mostly reblogs of funny or important stuff with a side of Aywas art.
Aywas

 

I managed a decent looking Octagon roof. I am pleased. I do not know how people can whip up beautiful houses in an hour or two. I have been working on this most of the afternoon. 

zooophagous:

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source
Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.
The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.
Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.
It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

Bees would be pretty fucked without beekeepers, considering that wild colonies are pretty well decimated and human intervention is the one thing keeping the populations up in some places. A healthy bee colony makes more honey than it can use, anyway, and it isn’t as if you’re scarring their poor little hearts for life by taking some of the honey from them. Not to mention, a skilled apiarist can tell by looking at the hive when it is sick, and with what, and how to treat it, as well as being able to check and treat for mites and prevent colony collapse and other animals robbing the hive and destroying the nest.
In addition, captive bees provide an excellent resource to study bees in general and find reasons that they’re dying out and develop ways to save them both in captivity and in the wild.
What makes me cringe most of all though is that vegans seem to think that bees have a concept of being treated as “slaves” and having their work taken advantage of. The people working sugar cane fields know what its like to be a slave. A bee never will.

zooophagous:

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source

Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.

The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.

Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.

It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

Bees would be pretty fucked without beekeepers, considering that wild colonies are pretty well decimated and human intervention is the one thing keeping the populations up in some places. A healthy bee colony makes more honey than it can use, anyway, and it isn’t as if you’re scarring their poor little hearts for life by taking some of the honey from them. Not to mention, a skilled apiarist can tell by looking at the hive when it is sick, and with what, and how to treat it, as well as being able to check and treat for mites and prevent colony collapse and other animals robbing the hive and destroying the nest.

In addition, captive bees provide an excellent resource to study bees in general and find reasons that they’re dying out and develop ways to save them both in captivity and in the wild.

What makes me cringe most of all though is that vegans seem to think that bees have a concept of being treated as “slaves” and having their work taken advantage of. The people working sugar cane fields know what its like to be a slave. A bee never will.

ryaninwonderland:

condom:

antiplastic:

ryaninwonderland:

there is a reason 12 year olds should not be on tumblr

image

image

that is the reason in case any of you were confused 

(Source: umbrhella)

elwynbrooks:

vegan-vulcan:

raccoon-eater:

lacigreen:

lalatinafeminista:

toomanyfuckscrusader:

hiddlefun:

cloudcuckoolander527:

talisguy:

Signal boosting in case anyone needed to know this. 

This is informative as heck. Show this to everyone!

This is actually some great info! Why can’t they teach this kind of thing in school??

Wow, I’ve taken health and sex ed three times during my educational process and never learned any of this. Thanks.

Definitely some important information here!

this is supa awesome.  i do think it should be noted that side effects of EC *really* vary.  when I took EC I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever.  

The more you know~

When I took EC, my period went missing for three months. Freaked me the hell out, despite having negative pregnancy tests. You cannot imagine how relieved I was to have it back.

PLEASE don’t be scared to take EC. Like some other women, I’ve taken it and it didn’t really have any side effects. The entire scare did give me incentive to go and get an IUD so that I am doubly protected, though.

(Source: rememberthstars)

thedisreputabledog:

obsessivelygalahad:

withagallifreyantwist:

americaninthedeerstalker:

Best. Cliffhanger. Resolution. Ever.

The way Jack is sizing him up, though. This is probably the moment he really, really decided “crazy, sexy bastard. I like him”.

Rose is just like

image

image

This is the moment. The moment I fell totally in love with this doctor. 

(Source: fluffalos)

failpanda:

lacigreen:

Urgent new video: Sam Pepper Exposed

Here are the disturbing unheard stories happening behind closed doors, other YouTube offenders to watch out for, and what we can do about it.

This needs to be seen.

galactic-kat:

wasarahbi:

emes:

leeantsypantsy:

all-aboutqoqo:



“We dressed up as the book Madeline, with six people dressed up as her and me as Ms. Clavel, their teacher. One of the Madelines, however, was the truly special one…the one with the beard, that is. Our experience was hysterical—I’d walk all the girls (and one guy) down the street in two straight lines. Guys would be walking the other way, whistling or hollering at all the pretty ladies. Then, as they got to the back of the line, they’d see my friend Brennan, then they’d see me, and I could tell that they were suddenly wondering if ALL the Madelines were men.”




the last sentence

lmao what

There will never be a time when I don’t reblog this because it is my fave.

galactic-kat:

wasarahbi:

emes:

leeantsypantsy:

all-aboutqoqo:

“We dressed up as the book Madeline, with six people dressed up as her and me as Ms. Clavel, their teacher. One of the Madelines, however, was the truly special one…the one with the beard, that is. Our experience was hysterical—I’d walk all the girls (and one guy) down the street in two straight lines. Guys would be walking the other way, whistling or hollering at all the pretty ladies. Then, as they got to the back of the line, they’d see my friend Brennan, then they’d see me, and I could tell that they were suddenly wondering if ALL the Madelines were men.”

the last sentence

lmao what

There will never be a time when I don’t reblog this because it is my fave.

(Source: moda-pura)